#207 is the store number in the Kinokuniya Building in Japantown.


Asakichi caries about 100 different styles and colors of cast iron teapots. Today, the iron teapot's traditional craftsmanship is combined with modern technology to cast a broad collection of treasures that perform better than ever in terms of beauty, ease of use, care, and durability. Frequently copied and imitated, the original Iwachu ironware is built to last for generations.

Cast ironware is a boon for cooks since it heats evenly, retains heat well and lasts forever. It yields important health benefits, too:
Iron Teapots

Iron-deficient diets are all too common these days and food or liquid cooked in cast ironware provides significant traces of this essential mineral.  

Before Your First Use:  
- While the pot is still warm, dry the teapot inside and out with a dry cloth
- Leave the teapot to air-dry on the inside 
- Thoroughly rinse the teapot with hot water


Each use:
- Never heat over a naked flame
- When using a hotplate, keep at a low temperature
- Never use in a microwave oven
- Do not leave any tea or water in the pot
- Dry thoroughly after each use
- Avoid contact with salt or oil
- Never suddenly cool the teapot when it is still hot
- Do not use any soap to clean the teapot! Use clean water only 
- Avoid kitchen utensils inside the teapot that could scratch the glaze 
- Always wipe the outside with a dry cloth while the pot is still warm 

This store also offers Iron Tea Cups, Paper Weights, Incense Burners, Stone and Bronze Sculptures, Zinc Figurines (e.g. Buddha), Singing Bowls, Wind Chimes and much more.
Trivets/Chakatu

We have a large variety of iron trivets, all of which offer excellent insulation, and are a perfect match for Tetsubin iron tea pots. They stand firmly and are gentle on any surface thanks to a high quality rubber on the bottom surface.
Cast iron boxes

Store your favorite Gourmet of tea, sweet, and snack in one of these cast iron boxes. There are no limits to the uses for these cast iron boxes as storage or curio decorations.
Paper Weights
Asakichi has hundreds of fascinating paperweights made from stone and bronze. They are not only functional, but extremely decorative and cute conversation pieces.

Wind Chime / Furin
Why the popularity of the furin? Japan has hot and humid summers. The little bell was a soothing and cooling sound that announced refreshing breezes were about to flow through their well-ventilated homes. The furi has become an important part of Japanese culture. There is even an annual Furin Fair that attracts 200,000 visitors. The Furin Fair attracts Japan's second highest number of visitors and features over 25,000 wind chimes.


Glass Animals
We have a wide variety of mini & large glass animals from all over the world. They are very unique and cute!

Samurai Figurines
We have a lot of Samurai figurines. The samurai (or bushi) were the members of the military class, the Japanese warriors. Samurai employed a range of weapons such as bows and arrows, spears and guns; but their most famous weapon and their symbol was the sword. Samurai were supposed to lead their lives according to the ethic code of bushido ("the way of the warrior"). Strongly Confucian in nature, Bushido stressed concepts such as loyalty to one's master, self discipline and respectful, ethical behavior. After a defeat, some samurai chose to commit ritual suicide (seppuku) by cutting their abdomen rather than being captured or dying a dishonorable death.


Daruma
We have various sizes of daruma dolls. Daruma dolls, also known as dharma dolls, are hollow and round Japanese wish dolls with no arms or legs, modeled after Bodhidharma, the founder and first patriarch of Zen. Typical colors are red (most common), yellow, green, and white. The doll has a face with a mustache and beard, but its eyes only contain the color white. Using black ink, one fills in a single circular eye while thinking of a wish. Should the wish later come true, the second eye is filled in. It is traditional to fill in the right eye first; the left eye is left blank until the wish is fulfilled.

Maneki Neko
The Maneki Neko (literally "Beckoning Cat"; also known as Welcoming Cat, Lucky Cat,Money cat, or Fortune Cat) is a common Japanese sculpture, often made of porcelain or ceramic, which is believed to bring good luck to the owner. The sculpture depicts a cat (traditionally a Japanese Bobtail) beckoning with an upright paw, and is usually displayed—many times at the entrance—in shops, restaurants, pachinko parlors, and other businesses. Some of the sculptures are electric or battery-powered and have a slow-moving paw beckoning. In the design of the sculptures, a raised right paw supposedly attracts money, while a raised left paw attracts customers.

 

1730 Geary Blvd suite 207, San Francisco, CA 94115
Cast Iron teapot & Bronze On Webster Bridge
TEL : 415-921-3821
: Mon.Tue. 11am - 6pm, Wed. - Sun. 10am - 6pm


Copyright ©2007 Asakichi LLC All Rights Reserved.